Increased bus service is coming to the Rogers Road community!












For the last 10 months, 134 Rogers Road residents and four local institutions (Rogers Road Eubanks Neighborhood Association, Habitat for Humanity of Orange County, Episcopal Church of the Advocate, Grace Community Church) have organized power through Justice United sufficient to win on their proposal to increase the bus service in the area.

Starting in January  the hours of the bus route will be increased by one morning hour and one evening hour. In August service frequency will double. This change will allow residents to commute to work, to access after school programs, and other important resources.













Prior to the campaign,  the neighborhood was underserved by the HS Route - often forcing transit dependent residents to walk two miles home from the better served lines.















​David Caldwell and kids
​at Rogers Road Community Center in Chapel Hill


The Board of Orange County Commissioners created this position in the FY 15-16 Budget to increase the accessibility and availability at each of the three community centers in Orange County. 
 
Mr. Caldwell will be working closely with residents, staff, service providers, and other stakeholders to ensure the delivery of high quality services and programs at the Efland-Cheeks Community Center, the Rogers Road Community Center, and the new Cedar Grove Community Center opening this spring. 
​David will begin his new role on January 25, 2016.
 
David is a lifelong resident of Orange County.  He has most recently served as the Project Director and Community Organizer for the Rogers Eubanks Neighborhood Association (RENA) and its Executive Board of Directors. He is also a member of the Coalition to end Environmental Racism, and serves on the board of Directors for the North Carolina Environmental Justice Network. David is also a Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) expert and has significant experience in supporting and leading positive community development across the region.
 
David retired from the Orange County Sheriff’s Office after serving 22 years as a Lieutenant in the Patrol division.  Prior to that, he served as a Sergeant in the United States Army Military Police Corps, where he performed duties as a general officer body guard, a Drill Sergeant, a combat participant during the Invasion of Grenada, and as an instructor for Police Officers from the Caribbean.
 
David holds Bachelor’s Degrees in Recreation Administration from North Carolina Central University and Criminal Justice from Mount Olive College.


Barbara M. Foushee, Secretary
Margaret Krome-Lukens, Assistant Secretary
Chapel Hill Carrboro NAACP Branch #5689

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"We must become the change we want to see."
--Mahatma Gandhi

RENA Community in the News

COUNTY APPOINTS FIRST 
​COMMUNITY CENTER COORDINATOR

Despite an agreement with the surrounding community, the landfill in Rogers-Eubanks, outside of Chapel Hill, North Carolina, has continued to expand over the past forty years.


On an autumn afternoon in 1972, the people of Rogers-Eubanks, a historically black community just outside Chapel Hill, North Carolina, gathered beneath a tree to witness the end of a dispute. They were led by David Caldwell, Sr., one of Chapel Hill’s first black police officers, in whose back yard they stood. Before them was a delegation of local politicians, including Howard Lee, Chapel Hill’s first black mayor.


Click here to read the whole article.